Français

Script 62.5

Notes to broadcasters

Save and edit this resource as a Word document.

In many regions and countries, people have difficulty acknowledging that HIV/AIDS exists; in fact they deny that it is a problem. This happens at many levels – with individuals, in families, local communities, and governments. This issue of denial must be addressed before other steps towards combating AIDS can be made. Other important related issues to address are fear of the disease and discrimination of those who have HIV/AIDS.
The following short program is concerned with these problems. It was written by a radio producer who is a member of the South African Community Radio HIV/AIDS Network. Members of the Network share and exchange scripts and audio programs via fax, cassette exchanges, post and e-mail as part of their efforts to increase HIV/AIDS programming in the region.

If you are looking for ways to increase programming, the South African Community Radio HIV/AIDS Network could serve as a useful model. There is good value in collaborating with other radio stations and producers to share programs and program ideas. For more information about the South African Community Radio HIV/AIDS Network, see the article in this issue of ‘Voices’ or contact: the National Community Radio Forum, Suite 109, Private Bag X42, Braamfontein 2017, South Africa, E-mail: ncrf@ncrf.org.za, Web: www.ncrf.org.za

Script

Characters

Announcer

Patrick:
Young man infected with HIV/AIDS
Trevor:
Patrick’s friend

Announcer:
AIDS is a killing disease everywhere. But most people are still ignoring it. They even ignore the advice they get from friends and relatives. Listen to this short drama about two friends, Patrick and Trevor.

Patrick:
Hey man, do you think it’s possible to get AIDS in South Africa?

Trevor:
It is. Even here, in our region, many of the people are infected. So tell me – how many girlfriends do you have?

Patrick:
Hey man, I have seven.

Trevor:
Do you use condoms? If not, you must go for a test. Otherwise you may be infected. And then you could be infecting some of your girlfriends.

Patrick:
Don’t worry about me. I normally use three condoms per round. And I trust my girls.

Trevor:
But how can you trust them when you know you are cheating on them? Don’t you think they could be doing the same thing to you? And maybe they aren’t even protecting themselves when they are with other men.

Patrick:
Hey, stop it! Just stop it, okay? My life is none of your business. I’m not like you who doesn’t even have a single girlfriend. I know life.

Trevor:
Patrick, I’m your friend, and I want to help you. You know that I’m always with you. But I don’t trust your health. I think you should go for a test.

Patrick:
Are you crazy? I told you that I’m fine. I trust myself.

Announcer:
After a couple of weeks, Patrick goes to the hospital for a minor operation. The doctors test his blood for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The tests confirm that he is HIV positive. One day, while still in the hospital, Patrick receives a visit from his friend Trevor.

Trevor:
How are you feeling today, my friend?

Patrick:
There is no longer any way to feel better, Trevor. The worst part of it is that I’ve got the HIV virus. Which means that eventually I am going to die. I’m going to die. (begins to cry)

Trevor:
But how can you be HIV positive?! You told me that you were using three condoms per round.

Patrick:
It was only a lie. I was trying to avoid telling you the truth.

Announcer:
Patrick lived for another five years before developing AIDS related illnesses. Patrick passed away two years after that.

This story was written by Rofhiwa Olga Netshikovhela, Producer at Univen Radio, in Thohoyandou, Northern Province, South Africa, 99.8 FM. After hearing the story of Patrick and Trevor, what do you think? Do you personally believe that HIV/AIDS is real? Please contact us at this station with your opinions about this story.

Acknowledgements

Contributed by Rofhiwa Olga Netshikovhela, Producer, Univen Radio.

Univen Community Radio broadcasts to the town of Thohoyandou and surrounding rural villages within a 50 kilometre radius, in the far north of Northern Province, South Africa. The languages of broadcast are Tshivenda, English, xiTsonga, and Northern Sotho.

Notes

Following are some suggested questions to discuss with the participation of your audience after this program has aired.

  • How many people believe that HIV/AIDS is real?
  • Are people protecting themselves? What are the ways that people can protect themselves?
  • What more can be done so that people will be aware of AIDS?