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Script 63.6

Notes to broadcasters

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The following script discusses the importance of proper sanitation and hygiene when working with cattle in a dairy. The program uses an element of mystery to catch and hold the listeners’ attention, and maintains it with clever, snappy dialogue throughout the drama.

Ask people at your radio station to play the three parts. Try to find people with distinctive voices so that your listeners won’t be confused by the fast-paced dialogue. Make sure they have rehearsed their parts so that things will go smoothly on the air. You can add to the effect of the drama by creating some simple sound effects. Animal noises, footsteps, and the sounds of doors or gates opening and closing can help your listeners visualize the dairy farm where this story takes place.

This program features the adventures of Vicky and Eddy, and is part of a weekly series on agriculture for rural youth of the Americas, produced by IICA in Costa Rica. See contact information at the end of this script.

Script

Characters

Vicky

Eddy

Farmer Sam

Announcer

Scene I

Vicky
-Hey Eddy, what’s the matter? You seem a little upset.

Eddy
-Yes, I just came from the dairy and Dorotea the cow is sick.

Vicky
-Oh, poor Dorotea. What does she have?

Eddy:
She has mastitis. I am very worried.

Vicky:
I can see that. Do they know why she got sick?

Eddy
-No. They told me at the dairy that they still don’t know the cause.

Vicky:
Oh well, don’t worry. She’ll get better, I’m sure. I’ll go and see her this afternoon, and if there is anything new, I’ll call you.

Eddy:
OK, that’s fine.

Scene 2

SOUND EFFECTS: PHONE RINGING

Eddy
-Hello?

Vicky:
Hello, Eddy. It’s me, Vicky. You must come to the dairy immediately. I think I have found the cause of Dorotea’s illness.

Eddy
-Why? What happened?

Vicky:
Come to meet me here, and I will explain it to you.

Eddy
-Okay. I’ll be right there.

Scene 3

SOUND EFFECTS: COW NOISES IN THE BACKGROUND

Vicky:
(Whispering)Over here, over here…

Eddy
-Vicky, what are you doing there? Why so much mystery?

Vicky:
Shhh! Lower your voice. I don’t want them to hear us.

Eddy:
We are going to get in trouble for being here.

Vicky:
I know, but listen to this. The boy milking the cows didn’t even wash his hands before starting to milk. This means that he is not following proper sanitary procedures.

Eddy
– What a shame! No wonder Dorotea and the other cows are sick!

Vicky
– We are going to have to do something about it.

Eddy:
I think that we should separate and investigate a little more, to see if – I don’t know – if we find other problems.

Vicky:
Good idea. You look around. I’ll stay here.

Eddy
-Okay.

Scene 4

Vicky
-Eddy, did you find something?

Eddy:
Yes, and I think that it’s urgent that we talk to Farmer Sam, so he can implement an Animal Health Program, before . . .

Farmer Sam
-(interrupting) Guys, what are you doing here? This is private property.

Vicky:
Hmm . . .um….well

Eddy
-Farmer Sam, excuse us for having come in without your permission, but we have toured the dairy and have found some problems that are endangering the health of the animals.

Farmer Sam
-What are you talking about? Please explain yourselves.

Vicky
-Okay. First, have you heard about the Animal Health Program?

Farmer Sam
-I think so. But, I am not quite sure. What is it exactly?

Eddy:
With an Animal Health Program, you can control animal diseases, and you also prevent them. The program consists of three parts. The first is to prevent the entry of new diseases, the second is to examine and evaluate the diseases that are already present, and the last is to develop a control strategy. Let’s go over to Dorotea’s stall and we can tell you more about it.

FADE OUT SCENE

Scene 5

Vicky
-Look, Farmer Sam, we believe that the cause of the mastitis in Dorotea and the other cows is that some of the milkers don’t wash their hands before milking. And they don’t disinfect the udders either.

Farmer Sam
-Yes, that’s possible, because one of my sons just started doing the milking – he has never done it before. I will talk to him, and explain why it is so important to keep clean when working with the cows.

Eddy
-Farmer Sam, as you know, if you don’t follow an Animal Health Program, other new diseases may appear.

Farmer Sam
-Okay, but you still haven’t told me about other problems you have found on the farm.

Eddy:
To begin with, the fence that separates your property from the neighbour is in bad shape. You should fix it as soon as possible, so the neighbour’s cows do not come into contact with yours. Also, one of your dogs was wandering by the cow pen. Other animals should not go in there, only the cows.

Farmer Sam
-(irritated) Probably the dog came in by the same place you did, didn’t he?

Vicky:
Well, yes, but that’s not the issue. I wanted to ask you what you do with the new cattle arriving at the dairy.

Farmer Sam
– When new cows arrive here at the farm, I keep them separated from the rest, for at least 28 days. Also, I call the veterinarian and he does several blood tests to evaluate their health status. After that, I allow them to mix with the rest of the animals.

Eddy:
That is excellent – you are taking the proper steps. The next part of the Animal Health Program is to determine what animal diseases already exist on the farm. Try to find out which animals are sick and find the cause of the disease. Then you can try to eliminate the disease, either with vaccines or with some chemical treatment.

Farmer Sam
– I want to tell you Eddy and Vicky that you have done an excellent job as researchers. I never realized that my animals were exposed to so many risks. From now on, I will be more careful, and put into practice that famous “Animal Health Program”!

PLAY MUSIC AND HOLD UNDER ANNOUNCER

Announcer:
Remember there are three parts to an Animal Health Program. The first is to prevent the entry of new diseases on to your farm, the second is to examine and evaluate the diseases that are already present, and the last is to develop a control strategy.

END MUSIC

Acknowledgements

This script was adapted from Program #208 (Animal Health Program) of ‘Net 25‘, a weekly series on agriculture for rural youth of the Americas, produced by the Interamerican Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture (IICA), Apartado Postal 55-2200 Coronado, San Jose, Costa Rica.