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Script 121.0

Notes to broadcasters

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In Malawi, like in many African countries, youths lack good knowledge of issues related to family planning, sexual and reproductive health, and safe motherhood. These subjects are difficult to discuss and people seeking treatment for symptoms, for example of sexually transmitted diseases, may be stigmatized. Solutions include: parents talking over these issues with their children, mutual support, regular sexual and reproductive health check-ups, and early treatment. These 11 spots address these issues. Feel free to use local names in place of the names in these spots.

In these radio spots, you will learn more about a variety of issues related to sexual and reproductive health, including the following:

  • Available sexual and reproductive health services
  • Modern youth make important choices about sexual and reproductive health
  • Seek early medical treatment for sexual and reproductive health problems
  • Don’t judge people who access sexual and reproductive health services
  • Get treatment for sexual and reproductive problems immediately
  • Do not fear relatives or friends, get treated
  • Routine check-ups for better sexual and reproductive health
  • Discuss how many children you want to have
  • Parents, a better source of sexual information to children
  • Parent talk to your children about sex
  • Message from religious leader about contraception and healthy child spacing
  • How many children do you want to have

The spots vary in length from 30-60 seconds and can be played multiple times during the program and throughout the programming schedule to educate parents, young men and women, and the general public on how to deal with various sexual and reproductive health issues.

 

Script

Spot #1:
Available sexual and reproductive health services

 

SFX:
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC HOLD UNDER BELOW

MAN:
What kind of sexual and reproductive health services are available in Malawi?

WOMAN:
We have many services. There is medical treatment if you are sick, plus testing, counselling, and treatment of STIs, including HIV. You can get good treatment and know your status.

There are also contraceptives and family planning services, menstrual health and sexual hygiene services, and counselling about safe sex. These are all available in Malawi’s health centres and at NGOs near you.

MAN:
Great. Are there any other services?

WOMAN:
Yes, we also have counselling and support services for survivors of sexualized and gender-based violence, rape, and early and forced marriage. These are provided by community-based organizations in some villages, and also at police stations, NGOs, and health centres.

MAN:
Wow, I had no idea. Thank you!

ANNOUNCER:
If you need help, visit your nearest health and service centre today. For more information, call the toll-free number at ___. (ADD THE APPROPRIATE TOLL-FREE NUMBER(S) IN YOUR BROADCASTING AREA)

 


Spot #2:
Modern youth make important choices about sexual and reproductive health

 

ANNOUNCER:
Are you a modern youth?

SFX:
SOUNDS OF CLASSROOM, STUDENTS TALKING AND LAUGHING IN THE BACKGROUND

YOUNG WOMAN #1:
A modern youth knows her HIV status and makes informed choices about sex because he wants a brighter future.

YOUNG MAN #1:
A modern youth avoids unsafe sex because he wants to avoid sexual complications.

YOUNG WOMAN #2:
A modern youth does not have unprotected sex because s/he doesn’t want unplanned pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, or HIV.

YOUNG MAN #2:
When someone make sexual advances to a modern youth, even a close relative, they tell their parents for support because they are determined to build a bright future. You can also report it to authorities for protection and assistance.

YOUNG MAN #1:
A modern youth avoids being with sexual partners in secret places to avoid rape and unplanned sex.

YOUNG WOMAN #1:
When a modern youth is raped, she informs the authorities and seeks treatment to avoid infection because she is determined to achieve her dreams.

ANNOUNCER:
Be a modern youth. Avoid unprotected sex, seek medical support if you notice anything unusual with your sexual health, and report rape and unprotected sex to parents and health centres within 24 hours.

 


Spot #3:
Seek early medical treatment for sexual and reproductive health problems

 

NARRATOR:
Do you worry that you have a sexually transmitted infection? Or signs of other sexual or reproductive health problems?

Seek professional medical help immediately. Delaying treatment because you’re afraid of being shamed for having an STI—or for any other reason—could be dangerous. The impact of STIs can be much more serious than shame. Sexually transmitted diseases can permanently damage your ability to father or mother a child.

Your sexual and reproductive health is part of your overall health, and there’s no need to be ashamed of seeing a health professional to stay healthy.

So make a wise decision and get tested immediately if you think you might have a sexual or reproductive health problem.

 


Spot #4:
Don’t judge people who access sexual and reproductive health services

 

NARRATOR:
Do you suspect that a friend or relative has a sexual or reproductive health problem? Encourage them to see a medical doctor.

Don’t waste time laughing at someone because they have a problem with their sexual health. Don’t judge them. Help them get quick treatment.

Laughing at and judging people who use sexual and reproductive health services only delays treatment. Applaud their courage for having the will to keep in good health.

Let’s treat each other with respect and dignity.

 


Spot #5:
Get treatment for sexual and reproductive problems immediately

 

SFX:
Sound of chicken and chicks.

MARY:
Gama, we are in trouble. I don’t think we protected ourselves fully.

GAMA:
Mary, what do you mean? I thought we used protection?

MARY:
We did, but I think we had an accidental burst.

GAMA:
Are you sure? Let me see … Shaa, you are right, the condom has burst. What are we going to do? Shaa … my body is frozen with fear.

MARY:
Me too. I am afraid I might get pregnant or, if one of us has a sexually transmitted infection, we may have transmitted it. What should we do??

ANNOUNCER:
If you are at risk of getting a sexually transmitted infection or getting pregnant because of a condom burst, you were raped, or you were involved in an accident where many people were injured and there was blood contact, visit a nearest health centre within 24 hours for voluntary counselling, testing, and treatment to prevent HIV and other infections.

 


 

Spot #6:
Do not fear relatives or friends, get treated

 

FX:
Hospital ambience. Babies crying off-mic.

DOCTOR:
Take the capsules in the morning and afternoon. After three days, if your sexual health problem doesn’t improve, come again.

KAMWENDO:
Thank you, doctor.

FX:
Door Opens THEN Closes quickly

DOCTOR:
Why are you coming back to the office?

KAMWENDO:
Shaaa … My niece works close to this place and just saw me. That’s why I didn’t want to come for treatment. I know she will judge and shame me.

FX:
Door opens

MRS. CHILWA:
Uncle Kamwendo, don’t run away from me. I will not judge you or talk about your treatment to anyone. In fact, I’m glad you quickly sought medical treatment.

ANNOUNCER:
Knowing someone who works at or close to a sexual and reproductive health clinic should not stop you from seeking treatment. Your health and well-being is a priority. Get immediate treatment and prevent the bad health consequences that come with delaying treatment.

 


Spot #7:
Routine check-ups for better sexual and reproductive health

 

ANNOUNCER:
Did you know that, to enjoy full sexual and reproductive health, you need to go for routine tests and check-ups just like dental health, diabetes, and high blood pressure?

Routine check-ups can detect problems like prostrate cancer, cervical cancer, haemorrhaging, pregnancy, and other sexual and reproductive health issues before they get worse.

Accessing sexual and reproductive health services is not a sign of being promiscuous. Taking care of one’s health requires routine check-ups.

So go for routine check-ups to prevent health complications and enjoy a long life!

 


Spot #8:
Discuss how many children you want to have

 

MUSIC:
TRADITIONAL SONG ABOUT FAMILY PLANNING

CHRISSIE:
Darling Maziko, how many children should we have when we are married?

MAZIKO:
Babie, I want to have three children. What about you?

CHRISSIE:
I want three too, and with two years spacing.

MAZIKO:
I agree with you, Babie, two years is good. They should indeed grow up together.

ANNOUNCER:
Discuss family health! Make a family plan on the number of children you want to have and the number of years between children. Choose and use an effective modern family planning method for good child spacing, good health, and economic stability.

 


Spot #9:
Parents are a better source of sexual and reproductive health information for children

 

SFX:
MUSIC UNDER

MAN:
Parents, talk to your young children about sexual and reproductive health. Help them think critically and make informed decisions.

WOMAN:
Don’t wait until your children learn about life, health, and contraceptives from their friends. Talk to them before they hear about these subjects elsewhere.

MAN:
If you don’t talk to your children as parents, they may get wrong and misleading information about sexual reproductive health from other people.

ANNOUNCER:
Talk to your children about sex. Learning it from you will help them protect their future, and reduce the burden of unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. Help them discover and realize their dreams. Talk to them.

 


Spot #10:
Parents, talk to your children about sex

 

ANNOUNCER:
If your children don’t talk about sex, it doesn’t mean that they are not having sex.

Parents and children, talk with each other about sexual and reproductive health.

Sexual encounters, pregnancies, HIV and AIDS, and sexually transmitted infections are rising among youths.

Talking to your young children about delaying sex or using protection is better than being sorry you didn’t talk to them after complications have already happened.

Prevention is better than cure. Talk with your children about sex.

 


Spot #11:
Message from religious leader about contraception and healthy child spacing

 

MUSIC:
MUSIC UNDER BELOW

RELIGIOUS LEADER:
Delaying sex is a traditional family planning method.

But if you can’t wait, use modern contraceptive methods to space pregnancies at least every two years. This will help maintain good family health, reduce family expenses, and help your sons and daughters have a good childhood and a good future.

announcer: If you cannot delay sex, use modern contraceptives to prevent health complications and poverty. Ask your health centre for a family planning method to suit your plans.

 


 

Acknowledgements

Contributed by: Gladson Makowa, Info-Exchange Agency/Story Workshop

Reviewed by: Miss Memory Manjawira, Nurse-Midwife and Client Contact Centre Agent, Banja La Mtsogolo, Malawi, and Idah Savala,

This resource is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada as part of the The Innovations in Health, Rights and Development, or iHEARD, project. The project is led by a consortium of: CODE, Farm Radio International, and MSI Reproductive Choices and implemented in Malawi by FAWEMA, Farm Radio Trust, Women and Children First UK and Maikhanda Trust, Girl Effect/ZATHU, Viamo and Banja La Mtsogolo.