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Script 118.0

Notes to broadcasters

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Women’s rights are often violated through all kinds of discrimination as well as physical, verbal, and psychological abuse. Everyone should mobilize to fight these problems that hurt women.

This series of ten radio spots focuses on some specific gender issues and gender-based discrimination.

Broadcasters can use these short messages in any program on gender issues, or even in programs that addresses broader community issues.

Script

Spot 1:
Suspension of some commercial activities

CHARACTERS AND SETTING:
Three women, including one civil and public worksengineer, one trader and fabric importer, and one hair salon owner.

 

HAIRDRESSER:
My dear, how would you like me to do your hair today?

FORMER TRADER:
Twists with a bun. Please send the bill to my husband.

HAIRDRESSER:
To your husband?

FORMER TRADER:
Yes, dear. I closed my shop; my husband doesn’t want me to work.

HAIRDRESSER:
What a selfish man!!!

FORMER TRADER:
He is also cheap!

ENGINEER:
You know, my sister, after studying construction and civil engineering, I established my construction company and I work on contracts. My husband supported me a lot. With my income, I also contribute to family expenses.

FORMER TRADER:
I envy you, my dear.

HAIRDRESSER:
Women should be able to independent and enterprising.

NARRATOR:
We women have the right to be independent and to participate in the development of our country!


 

Spot 2:
Feminism

 

COUMBA:
Aminata, what do think about fighting for women’s rights?

AMINATA:
Ah, Coumba, you know, these toubab (white people) things, I don’t care.

COUMBA:
Why do say toubab???

AMINATA:
Yeah, of course, this story of women’s rights, we don’t know it.

COUMBA:
Do you know what fighting for women’s rights is all about?

AMINATA:
Euh …

COUMBA:
It’s simply a battle for men and women to enjoy the same rights.

AMINATA:
Just that?

COUMBA:
Yes. Just that. And it is not a toubab battle, but something that everyone should engage it, both men and woman.

AMINATA:
You are right, Coumba.

NARRATOR:
Let’s fight together for our rights.


 

Spot 3:
Difficult access to land

 

SFX:
FARM SOUNDS

MOTHER:
With all this space, I could have grown citrus fruits and other kinds of tubers.

SON:
What are you waiting for?

MOTHER:
I discussed it with your uncle, but he refused.

SON:
But, mum, this field belongs to you. It’s your inheritance, isn’t it?

MOTHER:
Yes, son, but he is only going to give me a little family land as required by tradition. Unfortunately, this plot won’t grow enough to meet my needs.

SON:
This is not fair, Mom. It’s an abuse of power. We must change this.

MOTHER:
If this field were mine, I would have earned more money to pay for your education and offered you all a better life.

NARRATOR:
The weight of tradition should not drag people down. Women should have access to land as required by law.


 

Spot 4:
Female genital mutilation

 

MARIÉTOU:
You know, when I see you with your son, I have a strong desire to have a son myself.

FIFI:
What are you waiting for then? Take the plunge.

MARIÉTOU:
It’s not as easy as you think.

FIFI:
(LAUGHS) Do you want me to show you how to do it?

MARIÉTOU:
You will never change! (SILENCE) My dear, I had an difficult procedure when I was a child.

FIFI:
What?

MARIÉTOU:
Unfortunately, it’s true.

FIFI:
My goodness!

MARIÉTOU:
I was cut to maintain my virginity. Unfortunately, I lost my first baby because of that. I had complications during childbirth. I also had two miscarriages. Pregnancies have become risky for me.

NARRATOR:
Female genital mutilation is a painful process which has lifelong negative impacts on health and well-being. Let’s work together to eliminate this scourge.


 

Spot 5:
Violence against women

 

SFX:
CRIES AND MOANS

FATIM:
Aicha, Aicha, calm down, please! What is going on?

AICHA:
It’s Omar.

FATIM:
Again!

AICHA:
He got angry for nothing. He beat me all night.

FATIM:
You must report him to the police! If not, he will end up killing you one day.

AICHA:
I can’t. What am I going to tell the children?

FATIM:
If you die, what will happen to your children?

AICHA:
I am tired, and I can’t keep living like this.

NARRATOR:
It’s never acceptable for a man to physically abuse his wife or another woman. Together, let’s say no to abuse.


 

Spot 6:
Early marriage

 

MUM:
Racine, it’s time to eat. We are only waiting for you now.

RACINE:
I’m not hungry.

MUM:
What’s going on?

RACINE:
Mum, Sophia’s parents forced her to get married to a 45-year-old man. She went to live with her husband.

MUM:
In the middle of the school year, and she is only 14? It’s really sad for her.

RACINE:
She was brilliant and had big dreams for her future.

NARRATOR:
Early marriage deprives girls of their future and their rights. It must be stopped.


 

Spot 7:
Access to education

 

DAUGHTER:
Dad, when I grow up, I would like to be a heart specialist.

FATHER:
Girls don’t need to do long studies. You need to think about getting a husband and starting a family.

DAUGHTER:
But, dad, I want to continue my studies.

FATHER:
You will do like your mum. You will just take care of your family.

DAUGHTER:
But, dad, I want to be an independent woman and participate in the development of my country.

FATHER:
You will do it once you are with your husband. By the way, your aunt came to see us. She would like to introduce you to her son.

NARRATOR:
Access to good quality education helps girls participate in developing the country. Together, let mobilize to make sure girls succeed in school!


 

Spot 8:
Competency-based discrimination

 

ALIOU:
Where were you, Omar? I waited all day for you.

OMAR:
I was at the mechanic Fatou’s place. My car has some mechanical problems

ALIOU:
What did you say? I didn’t hear you right. You dare to take your car to a woman?

OMAR:
Of course. I have full confidence in her.

ALIOU:
Since when have women become mechanics? This is a job for men.

OMAR:
I can see you are attached to stereotypes from another age. Fatou did advanced studies in mechanics and she is skilled at what she does.

ALIOU:
Anyway, I will never give my car to a woman.

NARRATOR:
Stop discriminating against women. They are just as skilled as men.


 

Spot 9:
Women and sport

 

FATIMA:
Hello, Ramata! Where are you going dressed like that?

RAMATA:
I am going to train. I am trying out for a regional basketball team.

FATIMA:
You will never stop with your sports!

RAMATA:
I don’t think you like sport.

FATIMA:
I don’t want to look like a tomboy. You should remember that you have a girl’s body.

RAMATA:
You are criticizing me again.

FATIMA:
But we should preserve our femininity.

RAMATA:
Playing sports doesn’t affect our femininity at all. It gives us so many benefits. You are just scared of what people think.

FATIMA:
You are right about that. I am concerned about what people think.

RAMATA:
Fatima, you should care about all the benefits you can get from sports instead of only thinking about these stereotypes.

FATIMA:
It’s difficult, my dear.

RAMATA:
Have you thought about all the benefits sports could offer you?

FATIMA:
I will think about it.

NARRATOR:
We women should commit to fight all kinds of stereotypes.


 

Spot 10:
Competency-based discrimination

 

SOUKEYE:
Hello, Mamadou! Are you preparing for the club’s annual meeting?

MAMADOU:
Yes! I am even interested in running for a position.

SOUKEYE:
Which one?

MAMADOU:
The chair, of course. I have great expectations for this club.

SOUKEYE:
So we will be rivals because I too want to lead this club.

MAMADOU:
What!!! You are joking. You should lead the women’s committee.

SOUKEYE:
Mamadou, I am very disappointed in you.

MAMADOU:
This is not about you. It’s just completely foolish for women to hold positions above men.

SOUKEYE:
These old social beliefs are meaningless. I remind you that we have the same skills. And you should not think like that.

MAMADOU:
You are absolutely right. I feel like a bit of an idiot. I take back what I said.

NARRATOR:
Let’s change things and advocate together for more women leaders.


 

Acknowledgements

Contributed by: Amy Keita, Journalist, Dakar, Senegal

Reviewed by: Zaineb Kane, Lawyer and researcher/teacher at the Alioune Diop University of Bambey in Senegal and Secretary General of the Association of Women Lawyers of Senegal.

This resource is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada.