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Script .9

Script

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Spot 1:

SFX:
(TWEETING BIRDS, RUSTLING DRY LEAVES)

FARMER 1:
(WORRIED) This year’s maize harvest will be a big one. How will we manage?

FARMER 2:
We will need to hire some extra workers.

FARMER 1:
You’re right. But with so many people, I worry about spreading the coronavirus.

FARMER 2:
It’s true—coronavirus can easily spread between people who come in close contact. But what can we do? We can’t finish the harvest alone.

NARRATOR:
Attention farmers! This harvest season, it’s important to keep yourself and your community safe from coronavirus. Working outdoors is safer than working indoors because the open air and wind make it more difficult for the virus to spread between people. And it’s normally easy to keep a few metres away from other people who are working on the farm. But you MUST wear a mask whenever physical distancing is not possible. That means always wearing a mask inside a vehicle, at the market, or in an indoor space. If you’re outside, wear a mask if you’re going to be in close contact with someone. Be safe and stay well!


Spot 2:

SFX:
ENGINE RUNNING, VOICES CHATTERING. FADE UNDER NARRATOR.

NARRATOR:
Attention farmers! Here is an important safety tip about COVID-19. If you are sharing a vehicle with other people on your way to the market, you must all wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth. This is one of the best ways to protect yourself from contracting COVID-19, which is a disease that can easily spread between people in close contact through coughing, sneezing, or just breathing. Keep your mask on while at the market and wash your hands regularly with soap and water. Protect yourself and each other!


Spot 3:

SFX:
Phone alert

WOMAN:
(GASPS) I just got a WhatsApp message that another person in my village has been infected with COVID-19!

MAN:
Oh no! People must be getting worried.

WOMAN:
Fortunately, the person is staying inside their home and hasn’t had any contact with their family. Their symptoms are quite mild.

MAN:
That’s good. Sometimes people are so scared of the virus itself that they forget that there’s a person behind the suffering!

WOMAN:
Exactly. It’s important that we take care of each other, even when that means keeping our distance until they are healthy and well again. I think I will deliver some food outside their house so they don’t go hungry.

NARRATOR:
The vast majority of infected people will make a full recovery. But, if they have tested positive for COVID-19, they may be faced with fear, anger, or neglect. We can’t blame people in our own community for getting the virus—it is not their fault! We must look out for our friends and family, and protect one another. Stigmatizing COVID-19 patients and people who have recovered from the coronavirus hurts everyone and needs to stop. Let’s work together to stay safe and healthy during these difficult times.


Spot 4:

SFX:
Phone rings

GRANDMOTHER:
Hello?

GRANDDAUGHTER:
Hello, grandmother. How are you doing?

GRANDMOTHER:
I’m fine, thank you. But it’s lonely here at home. Since the COVID-19 pandemic hit, nobody can come to visit me and people are scared to leave their homes.

GRANDDAUGHTER:
Mummy and I are on our way to the market. Do you want us to get you some food and other supplies?

GRANDMOTHER:
Oh, thank you so much. I am worried about going to the market myself since I know the virus is more dangerous for old people like me!

GRANDDAUGHTER:
We will drop some fresh vegetables and rice at your doorstep.

GRANDMOTHER:
Oh, thank you! How is everything over there? I hope you are all well.

GRANDDAUGHTER:
Yes, grandmother, we are doing fine. It’s almost time to harvest the tomatoes …

SFX:
VOICES FADE UNDER NARRATOR

NARRATOR:
During the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important to check in on vulnerable loved ones who may be stuck at home. Isolation can make people feel scared, anxious, and depressed. But a phone call or simple act of kindness can make a big difference. Let’s protect and help each other. We are all in this together.


Spot 5:

SFX:
running water

CHILD:
Mummy, why do we use soap when we wash our hands?

MOTHER:
That’s a good question! It’s because water alone may rinse off dirt, but viruses and bacteria are so small that they can stay on our hands and make us sick. That’s why soap is so important—it kills the bad germs that get left behind!

CHILD:
But how does it work?

MOTHER:
Well, soap is made up of tiny fragments shaped like sharp pins. They’re so small that we can’t see them with our eyes. But if you rub your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, those tiny pins will pop the outer layer of the coronavirus—just like a nail popping a tire! Once the coronavirus is popped by the soap, it can’t make us sick.

CHILD:
Wow!

MOTHER:
Washing our hands regularly with soap and water is a really important way to protect ourselves. Hey, let’s play a game! Let’s sing a song for 20 seconds so we know how long to wash our hands for!

SFX:
Mother and child sing a local song. fade under.

NARRATOR:
Attention parents! Teach your child about the importance of proper hand washing to prevent the spread of coronavirus.


Spot 6:

NARRATOR:
COVID-19 can spread quickly! Especially in crowded places like markets, transit stations, churches, and mosques. So it’s important to keep a physical distance of at least one metre from other people wherever possible. That’s about the length of your arm span. In other words, it’s the distance between the middle fingertips of each hand when you stretch your arms as far as they can reach. If you are a market vendor, a bus driver, or if you come into close contact with other people, you must protect yourself even more carefully! Wear a mask or other face covering that covers your nose and mouth, and wash your hands regularly with soap and water for 20 seconds. Stay safe!


Spot 7:

NARRATOR:
Are you a market vendor? Do you buy from market vendors?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many marketplaces are adding health and safety measures like physical distancing and disinfecting hands and surfaces. If you are a market vendor, you may be at a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 because of all the people you come into contact with. But there are important things you can do to protect yourself and others.

First, always wear a mask or other face-covering that covers your nose and mouth. This will prevent you from spraying mucus droplets when you speak, cough, or sneeze. It will also help protect you from breathing in droplets from other people.

Second, wash your hands regularly with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before and after touching objects or surfaces that other people may have touched, such as doorknobs, coins, toilets, tables, and water taps.

Third, try to use mobile money as much as possible. This will limit contact with coins and paper money, which may harbour the COVID-19 virus.

Fourth, try to maintain a distance of two metres between yourself and others. If possible, use tape or a rope to draw a space around your stall. This will help you sell your product safely without coming into close contact with others.

By practising these tips, we can all stay safe and healthy!


Spot 8:

SFX:
women singing, fade under

WOMAN:
In our village, it can be hard to find disinfectants to protect ourselves from diseases like the coronavirus. But one important step we can take is cleaning our masks after every time we use them. We do this by leaving them in a pot of boiling water and soap over the fire for at least 5 minutes. The heat kills any harmful viruses or bacteria left on the mask. Then, we hang the masks on a line in the sun to dry before wearing them again.

I tell everyone in my village to wear their masks any time they come into close contact with another person, especially at the market, in vehicles, or in other crowded areas. Some women have even started selling their own handmade cloth masks to earn extra income. During these difficult times, we must all help each other.


Spot 9:

NARRATOR:
During the COVID-19 pandemic, women are busier than ever with responsibilities like childcare and education, farm labour, and other household duties. This is a message for boys and men! Help your mothers, sisters, aunties, and grandmothers with this burden. You can offer to help with cooking, cleaning, and shopping or by taking care of the children. Families are stronger when everyone works together!


Spot 10:

DAUGHTER:
SOFTLY SINGING

FATHER:
Grace! Bring your book and let’s go through your homework before I go to the market.

DAUGHTER:
Ok, father.

FATHER:
My daughter is growing up quickly, but she is still too young to think about marriage. She is a smart girl and my dream is to see her succeed through education. With schools closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have more time at home to study together. My wife is busy with other household duties, so I have made it my responsibility to devote time each day to teach her math and science.

NARRATOR:
Parents! Support your daughters to stay in school. Early marriage affects their education and prevents them from pursuing their dreams. Marriage can wait—let’s concentrate on books before babies!


Spot 11:

SFX:
WOMEN CLAPPING AND SINGING, FADE UNDER

WOMAN:
My name is Lupita. I am the chairwoman of the women’s savings and loans association in my village. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us have lost our livelihoods. It’s more important than ever for us to meet and talk about how to manage our money. But our meetings are different now. We must all wear masks that cover our nose and mouth. We sit in a circle, two metres apart from one another. We wash our hands with soap and water before and after the meeting to make sure we don’t spread the virus. We miss being able to hug and touch each other, but for now this is the safest way for us to protect ourselves and our families.


Spot 12:

NARRATOR:
Attention, listeners. During the COVID-19 pandemic, when so many of our health workers are concentrating on the coronavirus, we must not forget about women’s health and access to essential sexual and reproductive health services. This includes contraceptives, medication, maternal health checkups, and information about sexual health. If you are a woman who needs medical advice or treatment, you have the right to receive help. For more information, call [INSERT NAME AND NUMBER OF HEALTH CLINICS OR SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE SERVICES IN YOUR AREA]


Spot 13:

SFX:
HEAVY BREATHING, FOOTSTEPS. SOUND OF DOOR CLOSING AND LOCKING

SFX:
PHONE DIALING AND RINGING

WOMAN:
(BREATHLESS) Hello? Please, I need help.

NARRATOR:
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many abused women and children are trapped at home with their abusers. If you or someone you know needs medical, legal, or psychological help, call [INSERT PHONE NUMBER OR HOTLINE OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT SERVICES IN YOUR REGION] Remember: you are not alone.


Spot 14:

SFX:
Phone rings

PERSON 1:
Hello?

PERSON 2:
(Scared) I just got my results back … I tested positive for COVID-19.

PERSON 1:
(GASPS) I’m so sorry! That’s terrible. There is so much bad news about COVID-19 these days, I understand why you are scared.

PERSON2:
What do I do? My symptoms are very mild and my doctor told me to stay at home.

PERSON 1:
That’s good. You should always listen to your doctor’s advice. Try to get plenty of rest and drink lots of water. I will bring you some food and leave it on your doorstep, since I shouldn’t come close to you.

PERSON 2:
Thank you! I was worried that people would avoid me.

PERSON 1:
It’s true that you should stay away from others while you are sick. But don’t worry, I am here for you. Call me anytime with whatever you need. I hope you feel better soon!

NARRATOR:
The vast majority of people infected with COVID-19 will make a full recovery within a few weeks. If you test positive for COVID-19, don’t panic. Stay at home and monitor your symptoms. Call the health centre or clinic if your symptoms get worse.


Spot 15:

DOCTOR:
Attention listeners! Here is some important medical advice about COVID-19.

If you’ve been in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 or who may have been exposed to the virus, you need to stay at home and monitor your symptoms for 14 days.

During these 14 days, avoid contact with other people, wash your hands regularly, and sanitize any objects or surfaces that you touch with soap and water or alcohol-based disinfectant.

If you don’t develop symptoms such as fever, dry cough, body aches, or difficulty breathing during this time, you no longer need to self-isolate. BUT you must continue to practise physical distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing a mask in public spaces to avoid getting sick in the future.


Spot 16:

NARRATOR:
Here’s an important safety tip about COVID-19! COVID-19 is a disease that mainly spreads through the air, but can also be transmitted through physical contact.

An infected person can spread mucus droplets when they cough, sneeze, or breathe, and a healthy person can become infected by inhaling those droplets.

But the virus can also be spread if a healthy person touches a surface or object where the virus is present, and then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

That’s why it’s so important to maintain a physical distance of at least one metre from people outside of your household and wash your hands with soap and water regularly. Avoid physical contact by greeting people with a bow, a wave, or a nod. It might feel unnatural, but it’s for everyone’s safety!


Spot 17:

NARRATOR:
Getting reliable health information about the COVID-19 pandemic can save lives. But disinformation and rumours can spread just as fast as the virus itself—especially on social media like Facebook and WhatsApp.

Think carefully and critically about the information you receive and share.If you hear something or if you receive a message about COVID-19, check to see if it came from a professional and ethical newspaper, news website, TV or radio station. Only trust information from credible sources and health authorities in your area. Accurate information keeps all of us safe!


Spot 18:

NARRATOR:
Did you know that one key way to protect yourself from COVID-19 is to wash your hands regularly with soap and water?

Unfortunately, some families don’t have access to soap, which puts them at risk of catching other infectious diseases as well. For families without soap, experts suggest rubbing your hands vigorously for a few minutes with water to protect yourself against harmful viruses or bacteria, including the COVID-19 virus. But this method should ONLY be used if soap is not available and only as a last resort!


Spot 19:

NARRATOR:
Attention! Right now, there is NO cure for COVID-19.

People may try to sell you herbal cures or natural treatments for COVID-19, but these remedies are often untested and could be dangerous to your health.

The World Health Organization and scientists around the world are working hard to confirm the safety and efficacy of several drugs to treat and prevent COVID-19. But until a drug or vaccine is approved and distributed by a certified health authority in your area, please DO NOT take medication that has not been scientifically tested and verified.


Spot 20:

NARRATOR:
There is FAKE NEWS circulating on social media which suggests that a malaria drug called chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine could treat COVID-19. This is FALSE.

Scientists are testing several drugs to treat the symptoms of COVID-19, but right now there is NO treatment for this disease.

If you or someone you know tests positive for COVID-19, the best treatment is to stay at home, isolate yourself from others, and get plenty of rest. Most people make a full recovery within a few weeks. If your symptoms get worse, contact a clinic or hospital. Do NOT self-medicate with unproven drugs or remedies. Tell your friends and family that you are ill and stay safe.


Spot 21:

SFX:
YAWNING

WIFE:
It’s been a long day. The stress of COVID-19 these days is too much.

HUSBAND:
Yes. And it’s so difficult to find work. I worry about how we will feed the children. But I was thinking … Nkosi is getting older now. Perhaps it’s time we think about her marriage.

WIFE:
(SHOCKED) You can’t be serious! She is just a small girl. She needs to finish school!

HUSBAND:
(SIGHS) I know. But it would be one less mouth to feed. And maybe we could …

WIFE:
(INTERRUPTS) I won’t hear any more of this! Our daughter will NOT get married while she is still a child. School is the first priority.

HUSBAND:
(AGREEING A LITTLE RELUCTANTLY) Alright, dear. I guess you’re right. Our daughter should have the same opportunities as our sons.

WIFE:
We will find a solution. But we must keep our family together during this time.

NARRATOR:
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many families are experiencing financial difficulties and early-forced marriage is on the rise. But child marriage does not protect or benefit the girl or her family. It robs girls of their education, their health, and their future. Educated girls pave the way for a better future for the family and for the country. Say NO to child marriage.


Spot 22:

NARRATOR:
Here’s a message for fathers, brothers, husbands, and sons. You have an important role to play in ending violence against women.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, domestic abuse is on the rise and many women are trapped in abusive households with nowhere to go.

It is normal for many men to feel angry, sad, scared and stressed during this crisis—but it’s important to manage these emotions in a healthy way. Do NOT resort to physical or emotional abuse. Treat all women with the same respect you would want people to show your grandmother, your mother, your sister, or your wife.

Together we can end domestic abuse and keep our communities safe.


Spot 23:

SFX:
Phone ringing

WOMAN 1:
Hello?

WOMAN 2:
Oh, I’m so glad you answered.

WOMAN 1:
My sister, how are you? Is everything ok?

WOMAN 2:
(starts crying) No … we are still at home and my husband is still out of work. He is so angry with me all the time …

WOMAN 1:
Are you safe?

WOMAN 2:
No. He has become violent. I don’t know where to go or what to do …

WOMAN 1:
I am here for you. Stay on the phone with me. Remember, you haven’t done anything wrong; it’s not your fault.

NARRATOR:
Before the COVID-19 pandemic, gender-based violence was already a global emergency. But with so many stuck at home, rates of domestic abuse and domestic violence have increased. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence or other kinds of abuse, it is important to tell someone you trust, such as a friend, relative, healthcare worker, police officer, or community leader. The COVID-19 pandemic is not an excuse for violence—we must all protect each other.

(NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: ADD HELPLINE/HOTLINE NUMBERS FOR DOMESTIC ABUSE SURVIVORS – OR THE FAMILY PROTECTION UNIT OF THE POLICE FORCE IF AVAILABLE IN YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY OR IN YOUR COUNTRY. THE SITUATION WILL BE DIFFERENT IN EVERY COUNTRY SO PLEASE ADD THE BEST AND MOST RELEVANT INFORMATION FOR YOUR AREA.)


Spot 24:

NARRATOR:
Did you know that maintaining a healthy and balanced diet is one of the best ways to keep your body’s immune system strong? This may help lower your risk of being infected, or it may help your body fight off the infection if you do get sick. Of course, a good diet alone can’t cure or prevent COVID-19, but it can help you build and maintain a strong immune system, which is your body’s way of fighting and preventing infections. The best kinds of food to eat to boost your immune system and fight disease are: fresh fruits and vegetables including dark, leafy greens; nuts and whole grains such as oats, cassava, or millet; animal proteins like meat and dairy, or protein-rich legumes like beans and pulses.


Spot 25:

ELDER:
My child, I have lived on this land for many years, and I have seen many changes. But one thing that has not changed is what we eat and how we cook it.

CHILD:
Really? Like what?

ELDER:
Like your favourite yam porridge!

CHILD:
Mmm, yes. Mummy cooks it the best.

ELDER:
She does. And she learned from her ancestors, who learned it from their ancestors before. Do you know why it’s important to eat our traditional foods?

CHILD:
Why?

ELDER:
Well, foods like yam, orange-fleshed sweet potato, pulses, and beans grow well in this climate. So do some fruits and vegetables like watermelons, tomatoes, eggplants, and moringa. We value them because they are part of our culture. But they also add important nutrients to our diet, which keeps us strong and healthy.

CHILD:
And they taste good, too!

ELDER:
(Laughing) Exactly!

NARRATOR:
Proper nutrition is important to overall health and well-being. Eating a healthy and balanced diet also strengthens your immune system, which can help protect you from being infected with diseases like the new coronavirus. The best way to stay healthy is by eating plenty of whole grains and nuts, fresh fruits and vegetables, animal proteins like meat and dairy, and protein-rich legumes like beans and pulses.


Spot 26:

SFX:
TV NEWS ANNOUNCEMENT ABOUT COVID-19. FADE UP AND UNDER

MAN 1:
(MUMBLES) More bad news …

SFX:
BEER BOTTLE OPENING, GLASS CLINKING

SFX:
TV CUTS OFF ABRUPTLY

MAN 2:
My friend … you can’t keep drinking alcohol like this! Your family is worried. Let me take you home.

NARRATOR:
The coronavirus pandemic is causing a lot of stress around the world. It’s normal to feel more scared, angry, or depressed than usual during this time, and people are looking for ways to cope. But be careful!

Consuming alcohol is NOT a healthy way to deal with stress or other emotions. Alcoholic drinks like beer, wine, and others have little or no nutritional value. And drinking too much alcohol can lead to serious health problems. If you do drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Try to maintain a healthy and balanced diet by drinking healthier beverages such as water, fresh fruit juice, or tea.

Acknowledgements

Contributed by: Maxine Betteridge-Moes, freelance journalist and former Broadcaster Resources Advisor with FRI Ghana.

This resource is undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada.